“Traigo mecos de otro hombre” dice infiel esposa swinger mexicana a su marido y le platica todo

“Traigo mecos de otro hombre” dice infiel esposa swinger mexicana a su marido y le platica todo

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DESCRIPCIÓN Infiel esposa mexicana platicandole a su marido que trae mecos de otro hombre en su panocha

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  • Tam dice:

    “I proposed that a smlpie survey of “average” people to get their opinion on the topic would be the best way to measure this.”My first problem is with the question you proposed to ask. You proposed getting a list of what technologies people consider “essential.” As I and others stated before, it’s no surprise that the technologies that provide for basic human needs will always rank at the top. Those technologies are ones that are changing the least, so it seems you’ve already built your conclusion into the survey question.How about asking people point blank, “Do you think the rate of human technological advancement in the last 50 years is speeding up or slowing down compared to the previous 50 years?”My second problem is that a survey of public opinion is an inherently subjective measure. How do you make an inference from the results of your public opinion survey to objectively answering the question? “You seem to be suggesting that the opinion of a panel of self-interested “experts” would be a better measure.”I never suggested any such thing. I suggested collecting objective data that might shed light on the advancement of technology. Things like patents per capita per year, corrected for the subset of patents that produced products that people bought and used. Things like measuring how long it takes for individual technologies to go from invention to early adoption to widespread use. These measurements are objective facts that seem to me to have direct bearing on the question.”I think a technology’s biggest impact is when it first becomes available to anyone, i.e. the government, corporations, “the rich,” etc..You seem to be arguing that improvements in cost, accessibility and convenience are just as important as the initial appearance of a technology.”I guess we do have a fundamental disconnect there. I don’t think your assertion makes sense. How can an invention have much impact if it’s not widely used? If only a small few have and use a technology, how can any changes it might have on people’s lives or society be measured or felt? And how the heck would any technology ever become considered “essential” by the public and make it into your survery if it wasn’t widely available to them?And I’m not arguing that all incremental improvements in technology are “just as important” as it’s “initial appearance” but rather that a new technology won’t have significant impact on society until it crosses a threshold of widespread availability and adoption. What impact does the telephone have on civilization and communication if only 10 people own one?Additionally, the widespread adoption of a technology has more potential to drive new inventors to build on it. Once a technology becomes widely available, it drives other people to innovate in order to compete with it, find new uses for it, or create a newer technology that’s even better.”The leap from horse to Model T, I think, is orders of magnitude larger than the jump from Model T to Toyota Camry.”You misunderstand my proposal. It’s not measuring the leap from the Model T to the Toyota Camry. It’s measuring the time it took from those first prototype automobiles in the late 1800’s to the introduction of the Model T, and comparing that to, say the time it took from the first prototype personal computer in the 70’s to the widespread availability of PCs.If we’re talking about technology acceleration, the central question is how quickly new technologies are invented, how quickly they become widely adopted, and whether those advancements spur or impede development of new technologies. If more technologies become available faster and get adopted faster, and their use has a measurable effect on how our society functions and/or how people behave, then we can objectively say technology advancement is accelerating.Why do you think a survey about what people consider “essential” is more able to assess this than actually collecting the facts about which technologies were available at what specific times and tracking how quickly they got adopted?Maybe a survey of public opinion would be useful for measuring the impact of technologies on people’s behavior and day-to-day lives, but that’s only part of the picture. You still need to collect all that other objective data to construct a measure of technology acceleration. And I think the question to be asked isn’t, what technologies do you consider “essential,” but rather what technologies do you actually use day-to-day, and what are you doing differently now with new technologies that you or your parents or your grandparents weren’t doing 10, 20, or 50 years ago?